Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Know When And When Not To Trust

In a address many years ago when he was president of Brigham Young University, Jeffrey R. Holland made a gave a talk about trust, especially when it comes to fraud in the state of Utah. Too often, we trust people in this state because they happen to be LDS, or they happen to have a certain calling. Beware, then President Holland said, because looks can be deceiving. I have found this out the hard way.

I recently had to move out of the house I had been staying in due to the fact the landlord was getting married. I hadn't expected to have to move so quickly, and was desperate to find something. A friend said that he had an open spot in his apartment, and that I could take it if I just paid him the money in cash. I will admit, my intuition told me that this sounded a little too good to be true. However, since I was out of options, I agreed to take the spot.

Things were going well until yesterday, when I came home and my other roommates said that the rent had not been paid. The friend I had mentioned earlier was leaving the country, and had not paid the rent and an eviction notice was on our door. We will try to settle this in the morning, hopefully getting a new lease.

Let this be a warning to anyone: Never move into a place without reading and signing a lease yourself. Do not trust the words of anyone; they may come up void. A lease is a binding agreement and speaks much louder than words.


3 comments:

  1. The title implies that there is a time to trust, but the post doesn't give any conditions warranting it. When/whom do you trust?

    ReplyDelete
  2. The title implies that there is a time to trust, but the post doesn't give any conditions warranting it. When/whom do you trust?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In this situation, you trust the written lease. What I am getting at is that you should never just take a persons word in large money matters; you need a written agreement.

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